Players would ideally race to their published rating (aka. skill level). However, time and equipment constraints (e.g. number of tables, table difficulty factor, etc.) often necessitate short-format races to ensure the completion of a tournament in a timely manner.

The growing list of player ratings may be found here.

RATING

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

11

12

4

4-4 4-5 3-5 3-6 3-7 3-8 3-9 2-9 2-9

5

5-4 5-5 4-5 4-6 3-6 4-8 3-8 3-9 2-8

6

5-3 5-4 5-5 5-6 4-6 5-8 4-8 3-8 3-9

7

6-3 6-4 6-5 6-6 5-6 6-8 5-8 4-8 4-9

8

7-3 6-3 6-4 6-5 6-6 7-8 6-8 6-9 5-9

9

8-3 8-4 8-5 8-6 8-7 8-8 7-8 7-9 7-10

10

9-3 8-3 8-4 8-5 8-6 8-7 8-8 7-8 7-9

11

9-2 9-3 8-3 8-4 9-6 9-7 8-7 8-8 8-9

12

9-2 8-2 9-3 9-4 9-5 10-7 9-7 9-8 8-8

A comprehensive list of player ratings may be found here. Players rated 10 and higher are considered pros or very top amateurs some of whom are verging on the pro level.

The AllOutPool Tour Handicap Philosophy

A good handicap system shouldn’t aim to totally “equalize” the playing field. Instead, it should somewhat favor the better players that have worked tirelessly to hone their skills and become formidable competitors. But a good handicap system should also give the weaker players a fighting chance. Without this important dynamic, the weaker players who are aspiring to become better players would be robbed of the incentive to improve and grow into better players and competitors.

A good handicap system should make use of a rating system devoid of any personal judgment and biases. It should use all the available and relevant information (i.e., wins, losses, match scores, etc.) to quantify and zero in on the player’s true skill level. The more matches a player engages in, the faster the player’s rating converges towards his/her true skill level.

On any given day, the better player could be a bit off, opening the door for the weaker player to rise to the occasion and play above average to eke out a win. On the other hand, if the weaker player is off and the better player is on, the better player should always be expected to win. Even if both players are on their games, the handicap system should slightly favor the better player while giving the weaker player a fighting chance. This fighting chance is, in and of itself, an incentive to play well, with courage, and to hone one’s skills.

Striving to accomplish these goals is precisely the tour’s mission.

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